hayaomeowazaki:

Hayao Miyazaki

hayaomeowazaki:

Hayao Miyazaki

Reblogged from Film

Lupita Nyong’o for Person Of Forever.

Reblogged from pizza ✌
Reblogged from We aim to please.
Reblogged from PR-AY FOR MO-JO

cinemavariety:

All these years, all these memories, there was you. You pull me through time.

*cough cough one of the best movies of modern american cinema cough*

Reblogged from Film
Reblogged from bits and bites

immox:

I will always reblog this whenever it appears in my dashboard.

moviemezzanine:

The Studio Ghibli Retrospective: Tales From Earthsea
by Christopher Runyon
As has already been documented on the Retrospective, I wasn’t as big a fan of Isao Takahata’s Pom Poko or Hiroyuki Morita’s The Cat Returns as many others were; but neither of them were explicitly “bad” movies. While I wasn’t particularly amused by Pom Poko‘s surrealist brand of cultural humor, I appreciated how it managed to bring surprising depth and nuance to its eco-message, which could’ve been preachy and was instead handled maturely. The Cat Returns, on the other hand, was the studio’s most empty and light film at the time, but it at least had charm and likability to compensate.
I mention this because this week, we’ll be dealing with the first and so far only (in my opinion) “bad” movie to come out of Studio Ghibli. And Tales of Earthsea isn’t just bad. It’s actually pretty awful. An overly stoic, pretentious, boring, unimaginative trainwreck that just happens to have been made by some of the greatest animators in the history of Japanese anime. It brought to mind when I had to detail the monstrosity that was David Lynch’s Dune for his retrospective series, except whereas Dune was awful in very interesting, bizarre, hard-to-believe ways, Tales From Earthsea is just a cliched chore to sit through.
And like most ambitious yet misguidedly bad productions, the most interesting aspect of Tales From Earthsea‘s folly is, unfortunately, what happened behind the scenes. A fair amount of the studio’s feature films have been directed by other animators besides Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata at this point. But Earthsea bears the distinction of being directed by Hayao Miyazaki’s son, Goro Miyazaki, who was not an established film director — let alone a director of animation –, thus turning this into a project fueled by legacy.
Click here to read the rest of Christopher’s detailing of Studio Ghibli’s black sheep.

My new Ghibli piece is up! Click the links above to read the full thing!

moviemezzanine:

The Studio Ghibli Retrospective: Tales From Earthsea

by Christopher Runyon

As has already been documented on the Retrospective, I wasn’t as big a fan of Isao Takahata’s Pom Poko or Hiroyuki Morita’s The Cat Returns as many others were; but neither of them were explicitly “bad” movies. While I wasn’t particularly amused by Pom Poko‘s surrealist brand of cultural humor, I appreciated how it managed to bring surprising depth and nuance to its eco-message, which could’ve been preachy and was instead handled maturely. The Cat Returns, on the other hand, was the studio’s most empty and light film at the time, but it at least had charm and likability to compensate.

I mention this because this week, we’ll be dealing with the first and so far only (in my opinion) “bad” movie to come out of Studio Ghibli. And Tales of Earthsea isn’t just bad. It’s actually pretty awful. An overly stoic, pretentious, boring, unimaginative trainwreck that just happens to have been made by some of the greatest animators in the history of Japanese anime. It brought to mind when I had to detail the monstrosity that was David Lynch’s Dune for his retrospective series, except whereas Dune was awful in very interesting, bizarre, hard-to-believe ways, Tales From Earthsea is just a cliched chore to sit through.

And like most ambitious yet misguidedly bad productions, the most interesting aspect of Tales From Earthsea‘s folly is, unfortunately, what happened behind the scenes. A fair amount of the studio’s feature films have been directed by other animators besides Hayao Miyazaki and Isao Takahata at this point. But Earthsea bears the distinction of being directed by Hayao Miyazaki’s son, Goro Miyazaki, who was not an established film director — let alone a director of animation –, thus turning this into a project fueled by legacy.

Click here to read the rest of Christopher’s detailing of Studio Ghibli’s black sheep.

My new Ghibli piece is up! Click the links above to read the full thing!

Reblogged from Movie Mezzanine
Reblogged from Taken For a Fool

speakingparts:

Wuthering Heights, Andrea Arnold, 2011

Reblogged from The Swan Queen.
moviemezzanine:

Oculus: Turns Out It Was Just A Reflector
by Christopher Runyon
Not being able to tell what’s real and isn’t real in movies, let alone those of the horror genre, has become such an overused, pretentious cliche when it comes to faux-profound filmmakers. So much so that when a film like Oculus comes along and does it so damn right, it’s all the more impressive. But don’t take from that statement that that’s meant to be the main draw of Mike Flanagan’s psychological horror film. Sure the film’s central, malevolent mirror is able to alter the perception of those caught in its grasp, but this is really more of a gonzo elaboration of Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining than yet another Paranormal Activity style spooker. Oculus manages to excel not only as a horror movie, but also as a portrait of a family descending into utter madness, and how the buried traumas of our childhood continue to haunt us all the way up to our adult lives.
Grade: A-
Click here to read the rest of Christopher’s rave of the new horror film.

New review I wrote of a scary horror movie I really enjoyed! Click the links above to read the full thing.

moviemezzanine:

Oculus: Turns Out It Was Just A Reflector

by Christopher Runyon

Not being able to tell what’s real and isn’t real in movies, let alone those of the horror genre, has become such an overused, pretentious cliche when it comes to faux-profound filmmakers. So much so that when a film like Oculus comes along and does it so damn right, it’s all the more impressive. But don’t take from that statement that that’s meant to be the main draw of Mike Flanagan’s psychological horror film. Sure the film’s central, malevolent mirror is able to alter the perception of those caught in its grasp, but this is really more of a gonzo elaboration of Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining than yet another Paranormal Activity style spooker. Oculus manages to excel not only as a horror movie, but also as a portrait of a family descending into utter madness, and how the buried traumas of our childhood continue to haunt us all the way up to our adult lives.

Grade: A-

Click here to read the rest of Christopher’s rave of the new horror film.

New review I wrote of a scary horror movie I really enjoyed! Click the links above to read the full thing.

Reblogged from Movie Mezzanine
cinemagorgeous:

Poster for Noah by Yura Shwedoff.

omg

cinemagorgeous:

Poster for Noah by Yura Shwedoff.

omg

Reblogged from Film
thefilmstage:

Only Lobsters Left Alive.

thefilmstage:

Only Lobsters Left Alive.

Reblogged from The Film Stage

renquise:

alecshao:

Tim Hawkinson - Mobius Ship (2011)

WHOA.

Tags: art