sortofamechanic:

Now that’s a recommendation.

sortofamechanic:

Now that’s a recommendation.

Reblogged from bits and bites

mexicanfood420:

givemesomeknope:

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Some

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BODY

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if i don’t reblog this everyday assume i’m dead

what in the fresh hell is this?

Reblogged from pizza ✌
Reblogged from pizza ✌

jonnovstheinternet:

So I heard it’s Earth Day

image

Reblogged from Angie J. Han

meowazaki:

The Wind Rises (2013)

Words can not describe how much I love this movie.

Reblogged from pizza ✌

ladyinterior:

Illuminated Cut Paper Lightboxes by Hari and Deepti

Reblogged from On the Other Side
moviemezzanine:

The Studio Ghibli Retrospective: Ponyo
by Christopher Runyon
At this point in the retrospective, Studio Ghibli has been somewhat capitalizing on its international success by choosing distinctly western fictions to adapt, their last two films Howl’s Moving Castleand Tales From Earthsea being adaptations of distinctly British fantasy novels. So naturally, it’s only fitting that they’d bring that trend to its most logical evolution by (very loosely) adapting a full-blown western fairy tale, The Little Mermaid. And yet despite the clearly western material they’re working with, Hayao Miyazaki’s Ponyo is actually a return to the more Asian weirdness and surrealism that some of the Studio’s earlier films like Pom Poko and Spirited Away were characterized by.
A far-cry from both the original fable and the Disney version of The Little Mermaid we’re all familiar with, Ponyo is about a little goldfish girl named Ponyo who falls in love with a human boy named Sosuke and sets out to become human just like him by running away from her wizard father. In doing so, however, she creates an imbalance in nature, causing a massive tsunami to hit Sosuke’s hometown and inadvertently begin a new Oceanic era, just like in prehistoric times — we can argue about how accurate the science of this movie is when it becomes relevant, which is never.
Especially when compared to his other works, this is the lightest and fluffiest film to come out of Miyazaki in his entire career. Even his most adorable film, My Neighbor Totoro, is rife with a deeply melancholic undercurrent of emotion. Ponyo, by comparison, is primarily concerned with being as adorable as its protagonist, so much so that the darker, subtextual themes that Miyazaki usually likes incorporating into his work are very, very, very subtly implied here to the point that it’s in contention whether or not these themes have any actual bearing or meaning on the story.
Click here to read the rest of Christopher’s retrospective.

Here’s a new thing I wrote! Click the links above to read!

moviemezzanine:

The Studio Ghibli Retrospective: Ponyo

by Christopher Runyon

At this point in the retrospective, Studio Ghibli has been somewhat capitalizing on its international success by choosing distinctly western fictions to adapt, their last two films Howl’s Moving Castleand Tales From Earthsea being adaptations of distinctly British fantasy novels. So naturally, it’s only fitting that they’d bring that trend to its most logical evolution by (very loosely) adapting a full-blown western fairy tale, The Little Mermaid. And yet despite the clearly western material they’re working with, Hayao Miyazaki’s Ponyo is actually a return to the more Asian weirdness and surrealism that some of the Studio’s earlier films like Pom Poko and Spirited Away were characterized by.

A far-cry from both the original fable and the Disney version of The Little Mermaid we’re all familiar with, Ponyo is about a little goldfish girl named Ponyo who falls in love with a human boy named Sosuke and sets out to become human just like him by running away from her wizard father. In doing so, however, she creates an imbalance in nature, causing a massive tsunami to hit Sosuke’s hometown and inadvertently begin a new Oceanic era, just like in prehistoric times — we can argue about how accurate the science of this movie is when it becomes relevant, which is never.

Especially when compared to his other works, this is the lightest and fluffiest film to come out of Miyazaki in his entire career. Even his most adorable film, My Neighbor Totoro, is rife with a deeply melancholic undercurrent of emotion. Ponyo, by comparison, is primarily concerned with being as adorable as its protagonist, so much so that the darker, subtextual themes that Miyazaki usually likes incorporating into his work are very, very, very subtly implied here to the point that it’s in contention whether or not these themes have any actual bearing or meaning on the story.

Click here to read the rest of Christopher’s retrospective.

Here’s a new thing I wrote! Click the links above to read!

Reblogged from Movie Mezzanine

babyferaligator:

the first person that masturbated must have been like YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Reblogged from pizza ✌

men

Reblogged from cinefamily
Tags: sailor moon
hayaomeowazaki:

Hayao Miyazaki

hayaomeowazaki:

Hayao Miyazaki

Reblogged from Film